Microsoft Isn't Dead... Yet.

1/20/2014 Stephen Colbert 0 Comments


People love to proclaim the death of Microsoft.  Every time Microsoft comes out with something new, everyone tries to hate on it.  It reminds me a lot of the same complaints that litter my Facebook newsfeed every time the layout is updated.  If screams and cries of the naysayers were all acknowledged, I imagine we'd probably still be using Windows 3.1.

First, it is important to note that Microsoft has worked to unify the interface on all its devices with the "live tile" UI.  If you use an Xbox One, Windows PC, Windows RT Tablet, or Windows 8 device, the interface will be familiar.  This is important, because no other manufacturer offers products across that wide of a spectrum and also has a consistent interface.  Google has Chrome and Android, Apple has iOS and OSX.

The issue that Microsoft does have, however, is that--despite the visual similarities--each iteration is incompatible under the hood.  This is a problem.  Mostly a problem for developers, but that goes a long way to making inconvenient for users.

If there's one thing we've learned from Windows, though, it's that there is no problem so big that time and money won't solve it, as we're starting to see with Windows Phone.  Microsoft has been making noises like they may merge Windows Phone 8 and Windows RT down the road.

If Windows can successfully pull off as much merging of their ecosystem as possible, I can see that being a big draw for developers.  Imagine being able to download the same app on any platform in your ecosystem and have the data all properly synced through the cloud.  Yeah, there are cases where you can sort of do this today, but I'm talking about an ecosystem where your experience is seamless between multiple platforms without complicated workarounds.

Microsoft is probably the closest to pulling this off today.  So don't write them off just yet, because if they do pull this off, then we will be wondering why Apple and Google are so behind the ball on offering a truly seamless ecosystem.

Or, you know, they could fail.  I'm just saying they don't deserve to be written off yet.

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